Tag Archives: cultural diplomacy

NOMAD NOTES – Chapter 5 –Victory is Thriving in Spite of It

NOMAD NOTES – Chapter 5 –Victory is Thriving in Spite of It, on the bus from Vilnius, Lithuania to Warsaw, Poland, September 1, 2016

 

I’m up since before dawn, way before my 7:00 am iPhone alarm, with my mind rolling. I’m on an 8-hour bus ride from Vilnius to Warsaw, at a fraction of the price of flying. The driver is capable of asking for your passport in Lithuanian, Russian, English, and heaven knows what other language.

 

Bizarre_Bus_StationThe grim bizarreness of the bus station reminds me that I am in a city that is still recuperating from the Soviet era. Not so far away deluxe shops sell Italian bags to tourists paying with Euros; Lithuania just switched its currency to the Euro last year.

 

But here in the bus station my shocking failure to learn even the most minimal language is impacting my ability to find food I can eat on the bus. EVERYTHING is surrounded by a nice, glutinous roll, I don’t know the word for eggs or how to form a sentence, and I manage to buy an apple and a banana for the trip.

 

I survive getting stuck – together with my luggage – in a floor-to-ceiling turnstyle (think NYC subways) trying to get into the probable last bathroom on land. I’m out of change (what, you want a FREE bathroom??), can’t get out or in, and I’m saved by yet another compassionate young woman. Thank you, Universe.

 

At this point, my wallet is full of receipts, my bank account is close to empty, my emotional tank is full, and I’m flying back to New York tomorrow.

 

I’ve just been told that the bus I’m on will not be stopping at the stop I booked for, Warsaw Central, where I’ve purposely booked my last hotel. I’ve been offered a Metro ticket to get to my destination. Why? This is unacceptable. Traffic is impacting the schedule. Oh, I see. Thanks a lot.

 

I think back over the last two weeks. It’s incredible that I flew to Israel on August 14; was that just 2 weeks ago? It feels like a lifetime. I’ve cried buckets of tears and learned how much I don’t know, like most of the history of my own people.

 

Prague_Synagogue_namesThe Pinkas Synagogue  is the second oldest surviving synagogue in Prague. It commemorates about 78,000 Czech and Moravian Jewish victims of the Holocaust. The floor of the synagogue is below ground level, so it has been repeatedly afflicted by floods and moisture. From 1955-60, the walls of the synagogue were inscribed in tribute with names of about 78,000 victims. The synagogue was closed after less than a decade, in 1968, with the Soviet occupation of Czechoslovakia. After the Soviets were ousted in 1989, the synagogue was reconstructed for three years and then opened to public, but it took another three years to restore the inscriptions of the names on the walls that were damaged by moisture (or whatever). In 2002, an old enemy of the synagogue, flood, proved its power and the inscriptions had to be restored again. You cannot begin to imagine the immensity of this task; walls and walls and walls, floor to ceiling. Restored again and again. By hand, dauntlessly. So that the dead who had no graves would not be forgotten.

 

 

Vilna_Old_Town_street_3594.JPGVilnius is referred to as the Jerusalem of Lithuania. It was a center of Jewish learning, and was near the little town where my Grandfather was born and where other family members lived. While the Russian Czar was still in power, my branch of the family immigrated to New York City, in two groups, around 1900. First the father and the oldest sons (among them Morris, my Grandfather), then the mother with the youngest kids. Some other relatives immigrated as well.

 

Those family members who remained, along with almost all their descendants, were killed by the Nazis on the notorious night of November 25, 1944.

 

Vilna_ghetto_map_3554_LOI arrived in Vilnius from Prague by Air Baltic propeller plane, after some nerves but in good shape. A dear friend (and percussionist in my band) put me in touch with an American violinist who had been living in Vilnius for the last 3 years, and by a stroke of luck we were able to connect. Karen was a fountain of information and good advice and she gave me the tour of the Jewish ghetto.

 

No_there_there_3502_LOBut what ghetto? In Krakow, I had walked into the square and cried with the recognition that I had come home. The restaurants serving Jewish specialties accompanied by live Klezmer music; perhaps it had been diminished by the Holocaust but it was still there.

In Vilnius, there was no center. There was no “there” there.

 

 

Vilna_Ghetto_3510_LOThis great center of Jewish learning, of commerce and trade, where did it go? It disappeared, first under the Nazis and then under the Soviets. The market place, where the Jewish community engaged in vibrant commerce is now a little park in the middle of a road.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vilna_choral_synagogueBefore World War II, there were 100 synagogues in Vilnius; now only one remains, known as The Choral Synagogue.

 

 

 

 

 

Synagogue_Relics_3482_LOThe main synagogue was destroyed by the Russians in the 1950’s and only these relics remain, housed lovingly in the Vilna Gaon Jewish State Museum’s Tolerance Museum.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
On the plot of land where the Main_synagogue_3563_poster_LOmain synagogue stood, there now stands an elementary school, all trace of it gone. Just a poster, showing where it was, a photo, a description.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vilna_Jewish_Library_3619I had the good fortune to arrive during the 75th commemoration of the Holocaust, and Karen brought me to a memorable event at the Vilnius Jewish Public Library, one of several that had taken place this week. Family members of victims and survivors (who now live in Israel, the USA, and the UK) spoke eloquently about those who perished, disappeared, or underwent great hardship and cruelty. Commemorative plates have now been embedded in the streets of the ghetto to honor members of the Jewish community.

 

In speaking of their grandparents, they echoed some of my own experiences, acknowledging how difficult it is to find ancestors when the borders of countries changed every few years as a result of conquest. One could live in the very same town but one’s country of origin could change – what country are we living in today – is it Lithuania, Russia, Poland, Belarus? 

 

They also noted a typical psychological phenomenon – that survivors cannot talk about their experiences to their children but feel the need to tell their grandchildren. Another reason that in many cases, the information about the past has gone to the grave with those who knew the stories.

 

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In all the accounts, not just of World War II, but also European history for centuries, I see the theme of the Jews being the educated ones, those useful to assist in transactions between those who could not read (future of the Jewish lawyer?). Jews were successful merchants, prosperous hard workers and responsible members of the community. For this we have been envied, hated, stigmatized and preyed upon. Why?

 

 

When asked how the present generation can help to repair the past, the family members justly said that the first step is knowledge – bringing the facts to light.

 

“Worse than hatred is indifference.” Those who stood by and allowed the Holocaust to happen showed their indifference. Or perhaps they were governed by their own fear of being punished for speaking out or taking action.

 

Perhaps the COURAGE to stand up for justice for all humanity is the primary quality we must cultivate in the present and instill in generations to come.

 

Juditas_Grandparents_Father_B1913_VilnaThe last gift was when Karen introduced me to Judita Gliauberzonaite and her daughter.

Judita’s grandfather, born in 1913 in Vilnius, looks like my father, born the same year in New York, son of Morris from Vilna.

Her grandmother looks like my cousin Barbara. Same side of the family.

Judita said exactly what I have been saying, “Because they lived I am here.” We hugged and cried, having known each other only minutes.

In DNA terms, a long-lost sister.

 

 

As the family members said, “The greatest victory is surviving and thriving in spite of what occurred.” 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOMAD NOTES – Chapter 4 – Looking It in the Eyes

NOMAD NOTES – Chapter 4Looking It in the Eyes, Prague, Czech Republic, August 28, 2016

Synagogue_Krakow_3051_LOI’ve been trying to write this for a few days, since my experiences in the Jewish Quarter of Krakow, Poland, and my visit to the death camps at Auschwitz and Birkenau a few days ago. Today I will visit the Jewish Quarter here in beautiful Prague.

 

 

 

Prague_Castle_3232_LOThe Prague Castle compound is vast and gorgeous, and I sit here in my nearby apartment, hearing the early morning sounds of trams and cars, even on a Sunday.

 

I take my freedom for granted.

 

 

I grew up in New York, where the Jewish population was at least 25% of the city, as it was in Krakow before the Nazis. Krakow is still considered a center of Jewish life in Europe, and as soon as you walk into the Kazimierz district, you can see it and hear it.

 

Ethnogarden_3083_LOSounds of live Klezmer music pervade the air, as I stroll the square, past shops and synagogues. Tourists fill the cafés, here to see the setting made famous in our time by Spielberg’s film, Schindler’s List.

 The restaurants offer Jewish specialties like Gefilte Fish, and others that my food allergies no longer permit me to eat, but whose taste I remember.

 

I feel immediately at home, and tears of recognition fill my eyes. I’ve travelled half the night and half the day to get here from Tel Aviv. I’ve come to the right place.

 

At home in the suburbs of New York where I grew up, dinner was always served at 6:00 pm. There was no TV on, it was always a full meal, and we talked, discussing different subjects important to the family, what I did in school, even our philosophy of life. I was always encouraged to freely express my views, even as a child. (I notice I’ve used the word ‘always’ three times. That’s how I remember it; that’s how it was.)

 

Culturally Jewish and a born Buddhist, I believed then (and still believe now) in the equality and essential goodness of all humans; in each person’s capacity to manifest that goodness. This was one of the topics of conversation at the dinner table. And it was a debated topic: Nature or Nurture, or both?

 

The obvious example, with World War II still pretty fresh in my parents’ minds, was Hitler. Could he possibly have been born innocent?

 

My parents didn’t want to force their views on me, but they refused to buy a Volkswagon or other German products. I maintained that you cannot blame today’s generation for the errors of the past, which I still believe. Then the day came, in 9th Grade Humanities Class, when I was shown the photographs of piled up bodies taken at the liberation of the camps. I still remember those photos as if it were yesterday; they changed my life.

 

Growing up Jewish in New York I was not aware of prejudice. Yes, I was a minority in class in my neighborhood, but Leonard Bernstein conducted the NY Philharmonic and the vibrant and prominent Jewish population seemed to define the city. Jews were an important and respected presence, probably like they were in Krakow before the war.

 

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It has taken me all of my life to get up the courage to look the Holocaust in the face. My Buddhist chanting has strengthened me, and a few days ago, with my stomach in knots, I boarded a bus in Krakow for a guided English language tour of Auschwitz and Birkenau.

 

 

 

GUARDtower_TRACKS_3148_LO

The trip there takes over an hour, and they showed a preparatory documentary en route, during which I cried. The driver was friendly, the coach was comfortable, and when we got to Auschwitz, the visitors of all nations were plentiful. Well organized, each group had it’s own channel on the audio system, with a local guide who spoke the language needed.

 

 

GUIDE_3102_LOMy guide was wonderful. He was not dispassionate. He clearly deplored the degradation, deceit, torture and death inflicted by the Nazis in the camps. He made it easier for me to bear.

 

 

 

 

 

RAiLROAD_car_3151_LOThe camps are a UNESCO site, so preservation has been carefully seen to, with delicate artifacts such as human hair, shoes and personal belongings protected behind glass as you walk the camp and inside the buildings, with the guide pointing out both conditions of life and methods of death in the actual setting, telling stories that made it all too real.

 

 

WOMEN_CHILDREN_3108_LOThe railroad car in which they arrived packed like cattle, the train platform where 75% – the weakest ones who could not do hard labor – were immediately lead off to the gas chambers, the straw mats and bunks where people were jammed like sardines to sleep, the latrines where the guards timed each person 15 seconds, the crematorium.

 

 

CREMATORIUM_3145_LOI mopped my eyes and took pictures and video. If they could bear to live it, I could bear to look at it. And I’m shaking with tears now, as I understand why it has been hard to sit down to write this.

 

 

 

 

 

Ancestry_mapDNA analysis from two different sources (Ancestry.com and The Human Genographic Project) has told me that I am very Jewish. 84% Eastern European Jewish by Ancestry’s count, while results from the Genographic Project link my origins to the very first Ashkenazi Jews.

 

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I’ve come to the conclusion that I can’t know my own people if I don’t look at this. I’ve understood that being Jewish includes having the Holocaust (and the cultural survival of historic persecution, even though as a New York Jew I haven’t felt it) be part of the definition of who you are. Looking it in the eyes is looking myself, and the story of my DNA, in the eyes.

 

 

After learning everyone else’s languages and singing everyone else’s songs, I’m hear to learn about my own, to accept my Jewishness into my heart with pride.

 

NOMAD NOTES – Chapter 3 – The Kindness of Strangers

NOMAD NOTES – Chapter 3 – The Kindness of Strangers – In the Air between Tel Aviv, Israel and Warsaw, Poland – August 23, 2016

I must write this NOW; I already feel my mind slipping into a new reality, as LOT Polish Air flight 152 carries me to what I presume to be the land of my mother’s ancestors, who all had names ending with –-sky. Nothing further is known about their birthplace. Those with the info left this life before I had the awareness to ask about it. So I go to stand where they stood. Tonight I will sleep in Krakow, Poland, in the Jewish quarter that still remains, even after the Holocaust, and I will visit Auchwitz, because now I am strong enough to bear it. I hope.

 

But first a tribute to the kindness of strangers in Israel.

 

Myth: Everything in Israel is in English.

Myth: Everyone in Israel speaks English.

Myth: Everyone in Israel is Jewish.

 

The wedding over, the relatives kissed, the presents given, the advice taken in, I took off in my red Kia for Akko, a Mediterranean port near Haifa, which was populated at least as far back as 500 B.C. (Hellenistic Greek ruins have been found; but it’s probably WAY WAY older) and which was the gateway for pilgrims traveling to the Holy Land during the Crusades in medieval times. I did not go straight there; to satisfy my curiosity I took a quick side trip to Tsfat (aka Zefat, aka Safed) high above the Sea of Galilee, a center for Klezmer music and extreme Jewish faith.

 

gas_station_2977_israel.jpg I stopped for gas. (Which by the way costs more than $50 a tank.) But how to fill it? No English option on the gas pump. If you need someone to speak English in Israel, ask young people. They learn it in school.

A lovely young woman taught me how: first you put the nozzle in the car. Then the credit card. Then you enter your license plate number, then your ID number, in my case my passport number. Then you can buy the gas. Note to USA Homeland Security.

 

The new navigation app WAZE was invented by an Israeli, and I’ve now downloaded it and made it speak to me in English. It’s great. Up the mountain to Tsfat.

 

Tsfat.jpgSince I arrived in Tsfat on the Sabbath, I was treated to a demonstration of that town’s extreme faith by the complete lack of activity in the town, which was to be expected. I headed down the mountain and west to the Mediterranean coast, to Akko (aka Acco, aka Acre, aka Akka), in search of my ancient past. It is blazing hot.

 

 

 

 

 

spices_2958_LO_copy.jpgIsrael is a narrow country and I arrive about 2 hours later at the ancient Mediterranean port of Akko. It is immediately apparent that I am in a different culture, while still within Israel. The roads are very narrow, the stores have signs in Arabic (an official language of Israel, along with Hebrew), the women are in head scarves and dressed very conservatively, the sounds of Arabic music waft through the air. And here’s me, brazenly coming into town in my red Kia.

 

A man is headed directly at me on his bicycle. My danger “flares” go up. I consider myself open-minded and progressive, yet in an instant I have identified him as “Arab” and his action as a dare. As if daring me to stop, swerve, or hit him. Is this a power struggle? Is it because I am a Western woman driving a red car? Perhaps just because the streets are too narrow for modern day traffic? I brake and avoid him, of course. He does not slow down. I’m now on my guard. And I’m aware that I just had a demonstration of my own prejudice.

 

Akko_Minaret_Mosque_Palms_2935_LOI make my way to my hotel, built into the medieval walls of the Crusades era. I park, check in, clean up, and head out at sunset to find a fresh fish for dinner. My short walk to the port confirms that I am in a different culture. Arabic music accompanies a horse-drawn carriage giving rides on the narrow cobbled streets, already crowded with impossible 2-way car traffic and pedestrians. Boats in the harbor also play music, wild and fast, families crowd the port, speaking in Arabic, a mosque in view.

 

I feel conspicuous in my mini-skirt as I enter a restaurant and ask for a table for 1. Glad I have my long black cotton sweater on to cover my arms and legs, I sit and order. I’m ready for a vodka, but there is none, and I wouldn’t order it here anyway. The dinner is delicious and by the end I’m asked by the waiter where I come from. When I answer “San Francisco,” he nods knowingly. We smile. That explains it.

 

Akko_cafe_2923_LODAY TWO IN AKKO: I rise early to head out with my video camera, to capture the ancient streets in the morning light.

At the port, different in the daylight, I come upon a huge dead rat in the street, already being fed upon by insects. I’m revolted, and must remind myself that my dearest Venice, another port city, has its share of these tenaciously disgusting creatures. Both cities have a population of stray cats, which hopefully helps to keep things in check.

 

Akko_arch_fleurDeLis_2938_LOAfter breakfast, I purchase some items in the open air market on my way to the tourist info center. I walk where the Knights Templar have ridden, where pilgrims were cared for on their way to Jerusalem, traversing underground tunnels constructed 1000 years ago.

 

In the afternoon, I head off in the car, thinking I’m making a short trip to the Baha’i Gardens, but I miss the turn and so decide to go to Haifa instead, 25 minutes south. Not having researched (word to the wise: if you don’t know the language, do the research first)

I log into WAZE and simply put in Haifa Port.

 

 

 

I end up behind a slow moving line of huge trucks, bound for the port. I’m locked in, there are no turnoffs, my phone is dying, I don’t have my backup charger and I have very few Israel shekels with me. And I don’t actually know where I am going. I want to find a nice café, then a nice place to have dinner after I tour the town.

 

HA-HA. I finally get out of the truck line and bail to a working class neighborhood, which might have been called HADAR, near Haifa’s City Hall. Triumphantly I find a parking lot that has a system like the Sutter-Stockton Garage in San Francisco; you get a ticket upon entering and pay at a machine before you  leave.

 

Another fabulous young Israeli woman answers my questions about the parking lot, I go check out the machine where I’ll pay in the end, and I’m off on foot, phone dead, making little drawings and notes with a pen in my diary so I can find my way back. Like breadcrumbs.

 

Gone my thoughts of dinner in Haifa, over a double espresso I decide I’d better head back to Akko. I pass a cellphone store. A Russian man sells me a car charger for my last 25 shekels. The box is so old he throws it away; the receipt is so faint as to be barely readable. He says I can return it if it doesn’t work. Fat chance.

 

I put my Wells Fargo bank card in at Bank Hapolim, expecting to get shekels. They don’t accept it.

 

I re-trace my steps to the parking lot, sure I can pay with my credit card for my parking. Again, no English in the machine. I buzz and ask for help in English. A male voice yells at me in Hebrew, obviously saying “I don’t speak English; don’t you understand?”

 

Yet another lovely young woman passes and understands my plight. She escorts me up one floor in the elevator, using gestures to communicate. Calls the supervisor to help. Puts my card in for me, helps me pay. I’m good to go. Blessings on you, thank you.

 

Now, just to get back to Akko with no cell phone, and not even a paper map. As you may expect, the car charger sold me by the Russian guy is a dud.

 

It’s time to roll down the car window and do it like the old days. Gestures and the name of the destination. At a traffic light, I ask a guy on the curb, “Which way, Akko?” He understands the question but has trouble explaining. I say, with hand gestures, “22, Blue?” (Route 22, designated by blue signs). A triumphant Yes! We have communicated. I’m off to Akko, which I reach fairly quickly with a sigh of relief.

 

But it’s not over yet.

 

Akko_Minaret_2919_LOIn the maze of narrow streets and roundabouts, I make a wrong turn. I need to retrace my route in the town. The nightmare of the narrow streets is now mine. Scared I’m going to scratch my rented car, lost, making my second K-turn with no space, it is 7:25pm, the skies are darkening and the Moslem call to prayer sounds from a mosque right near me. But I have no cellphone to record it.

 

A lovely Arabic man rescues me, guides me through a narrow passage and instructs me how to get back to my hotel. In English. I’m SO grateful, and silently vow to toast him with a vodka in my hotel bar immediately upon my return.

 

Which I do. I’ve learned a lot in Akko.

On the learning curve to Like A Bridge, our new recording project

Like A Bridge:

Photo by Kingmond Young

BLOG: On the learning curve to Like A Bridge, our new recording project

LUA HADAR

11/29/11

I’m a member of the 99%. Most of us are. I’m just (just J) trying to fulfill my potential, make a living, have a life.

Spiritually speaking, I was raised Liberal-New-York-Jewish and now would consider myself a Buddhist and a Pantheist. What that means to me is that I believe in a great spirit of the Universe that is in all of us and in all things. My grandmother, a contradiction in herself as a Jewish-Christian Scientist-Nurse, taught me so.

Humankind has found many ways to call that Spirit and has built structures such as religions around it, but I believe that the Spirit existed before Humankind, and gave birth to it. It is the energy of the Universe. As such, we are ALL members of the 99%, EVEN that last 1%.

I also believe in our own power to use that Spirit. As an Indie-Performer-Producer, I’m noticing that about every 3 years, I have something to say that feels and sounds different from before, and I’ve been percolating that feeling for about a year now. I feel like somehow, as a human, I’ve come of age. Maybe it is because I have been teaching so much in the last year. Or because of the inevitable – and non-inevitable – losses of loved ones that come in The Middle Third of life, as I’ve euphemistically been calling middle age for some years, now; since 2005.

I started feeling like I was in The Middle Third when my Mom passed away in July of 2004; she was preceded by my older brother, and by my father before that. She was the last.

Psychologists tell us that the loss of one’s parents creates the awareness of our own mortality and also “promotes us” (my quotes) to being the reigning generation. Youth in their 20’s are now the younger generation of adults. We in The Middle Third (say, age 35-65, for example) are the ones with the bulk of the responsibility for the moving and shaking of the world; and a responsibility to mentor the next generation, both by direct instruction and by our own example.

I note that it is 7 years since my mother’s passing, and I feel as if all my cells have rearranged themselves inside my body. So much so that I got my hair cut last June. It was a big deal to feel like I wanted to do that. Perhaps it is because all my cells have rearranged that I have something to say, which means it is time to create a new music and performance project, because that is my language of expression.

This is my belief and this is a concept I want to articulate: Since Humankind is all One, and since the World was born without borders, all humans have the RIGHT to equality and to the fulfillment of the same basic needs: food, shelter, healthcare, safety, liberty, self-expression. I truly believe that if ALL humans were treated that way, we would pass into a new era, without the need for war or terrorism.

Hence the birthing over the last few months, of a new project. Since these things seem to happen every 3 years, I am getting wise and CONCIEVING of it AS a 3-year project, and it is more complex than before, so I think it will TAKE 3 years.

In the time since my last CD project, I’ve also birthed my teaching studio and a broadening cultural exchange with France; they will be woven into the new project, because they are now an important part of me.

The 3-year Bridges Project will have as its centerpiece our upcoming CD and DVD recording project, Like a Bridge. I just got a release date for the CD in New York City on April 14, 2012. We will release the DVD on the West Coast after that. Now we have to record. Ha ha

Ha ha because as I write I have not finalized a venue in which to record, nor booked the band for the specific date because I have no specific date yet, I have not done the fundraising, I do not know all the songs and some of them are in new languages for me, I am not sure of the set list, the charts have to be done, I do not have a publicist and the concept just became clear to me today. And it’s the holiday season.

On the other hand, I have amazing musicians, interesting arrangements in the making, a music director whom I revere, a producer with a rolodex to die for, and somehow, by the grace of the Universe, the video director who’s worked with Mariah Carey, Sting and Tony Bennett.

Like A Bridge is, like all my recordings, both a snapshot of where my ‘head’ is right now and also a sum total of who I am as a result of all that has come before this, personally as well as musically. Influencing me very strongly at this point in my life is the awareness of mortality and the need to make something of value that can effect change. The sum total of my many years of life experience includes creating projects with people from other countries, teaching students from age 3 to age 80, making music with music director Jason Martineau since 2005, becoming a Buddhist, realizing my innate abilities, learning many new skills; like all of us; we live, we learn and we become who we are.

Before I became verbal about the theme of this recording, all I could do when I explained it to people was to hold my arms out, as if embracing the world, and cry. If I could do something, anything, to help to heal the fundamental darkness in the world, I would like to try. To me, it involves helping people to see the bigger picture, the zoomed out shot of the world in which it is one world, with no borders, everyone descending from common ancestors, and realizing that we all deserve a decent life, safe from strife. Hmm – song lyric.

What people hear and sing, they remember, and maybe can live by. So I want there to be as many languages on this CD as I can muster, songs from as many countries and origins as I can manage, and stories of bridges between it all. Why is this song a bridge, and to what? The songs are bridges simply by virtue of the fact that they come from other countries; some songs, like Bridge Over Troubled Water, talk about bridges between people; about the bridge I want to be.

The inspirational quote came from the family that hosted us in Lille, France, for last year’s cultural exchange – here’s an excerpt from the larger passage, written by Séverine Suffys:

Lua et Candace savent chanter. Lua and Candace know how to sing.

Elles savent la langue des autres. They know the language of others.

No borders! Avec un charme fou, la voix de Lua s’élève, au-dessus des “ponts de Paris”.

No borders! With a crazy charm, Lua’s voice rises above “the bridges of Paris.”

Bien au-delà!Well beyond!

A la rencontre des musiciens français qui inventent les rythmes et les mélodies des golden gates.

To the meeting with French musicians who invent rhythms and melodies of golden gates.

Des ponts à danser sur toutes les musiques du monde.

Bridges on which to dance to all the music of the world.

Yikes I am in the middle of another learning curve and I’m holding on tight.  How did this all evolve? What’s happening? Who’s on first?

In the 1990’s I became enamored of a song called Child of Man, by an Israeli-American pop artist; a Swiss friend who came to visit me in San Francisco introduced me to the music of Noa. I was awed by her musicianship and drawn to the energy of the world beat song. I tried teaching it to kids because I loved the message. I’m a strong believer in songs that have meaningful lyrics.

Fast forward 15 years of teaching, cultural exchange, performances, recordings. And living and dying. And schlepping. Do not forget the schlepping.

For the new recording with my band, TWIST, Child of Man re-enters my head. It enters in the spring of 2011 and is performed with music director Jason Martineau at a June Salon Concert at my studio, where the audience was asked to comment on potential songs for the upcoming recording. Child of Man was well received. Somehow it is the anchor piece of the new CD. Yet nobody knows this song.

But when I sought out Global Percussionist Ian Dogle, he knew Child of Man, of course. I met Ian years ago, when I taught at a magnet school for the arts in Redwood City. I booked him to perform for the kids – a global percussion concert for an assembly. He was great and I never forgot him. During 2011, I saw him perform with Ancient Future at Yoshi’s. A friend from the band put us in touch. I wanted my new CD to be more world, more driving; Ian was the musician to help me make it so. I was honored to have a meeting of the minds with this inspiring performer, musical, cultural, philosophical.

Prepping for that Salon Concert, which was in early June 2011, really gave me a kick in the pants, you might say. I learned a bunch of new songs in a short time and really got to remember that I was a singer in addition to being a producer and a teacher. Five of the songs we performed will indeed find their way on to the new recording.

By late June, another stunning influence had appeared in my life: Maxime Le Forestier, whose 1971 French hit pop song, San Francisco, had been a favorite on our set list since 2009. He came to San Francisco for the 40th Anniversary of this famous song about The Blue House, and Jason and I got to sing with him and for him. I had begun to delve into his discography and loved a world beat song called Né Quelque Part (Born Somewhere). He tried to teach me how to say the chorus in the Zulu with the difficult-to-learn mouth click, at which I was shockingly unsuccessful. I listened to his recording, and to the live one on Youtube. I needed a Zulu Choir. And I found one, right here in Oakland. O, bountiful Universe. We have connected at last and they will record with us on Maxime’s song.

Incidentally, I am expecting a learning curve on the acquisition of rights that will need to be obtained for all these songs, mechanical rights for the making of a physical CD, digital rights for online distribution, and probably video rights as well. That’s the new part.

Our original idea was to do this live in concert in front of a live audience. Then the concept of streaming the concert on the Internet was added to the picture because of the capabilities of one of the studios we were considering. Some Irish producers from the BBC came to visit us on Halloween. We started trying to define “broadcast quality” by talking to them, with the idea of making not only a DVD and music videos but creating something with the specs that could go on TV, should we be so lucky.

By now this is sounding immense to me. We establish what the production schedule would look like – tech in on Friday, audience in on Saturday, re-takes on Sunday. We get the quote from this high profile venue. For the venue and the engineering, which will be absolutely top of the line. To that we must add video cameras, and the all-important lighting. Unless you are 20, you need great lighting, at whatever price, because you can throw the whole thing out if you don’t look good, am I right? And this is a huge venue and would require a lot of lighting. Plus, in any venue with a project like this, a Director of Photography, which is what is known in the theatre world as a lighting designer, and then you need the lighting tech. And an Art Director. Which reminds me, you would not THINK of doing this without a makeup artist and a hair stylist. Look, Ma, I’m in the movies. My head is spinning.

The schedule changes with a new scenario, a new way to think about it, proposed by our Director, which would work for the smaller recording venue, the scenario that might result in a more realistic budget. Need to wrap my brain around that. Am I giving up the original reason for doing this?

This is where you need a co-producer who has her feet on the ground, experience under her belt, and your best interests at heart. She is there when the Director comes up with that great idea for using the smaller studio that changes the concept of the project. And you both know that you trust him like crazy and that you’d be nuts to do it in the bigger venue with the budget from hell.

So I haven’t signed on the dotted line yet, but I think we know what we’re doing, when we’re doing it, and generally how we’re doing it. Will keep you posted as things evolve. Very quickly.

” …the way to counter the long, historical cycle of hatred and vengeance is to evoke the compassionate and constructive energy inherent in human life and use it to counter the energy of enmity and destruction. Buddhism believes in the Buddha nature—that is, the good—in all people… ”  – Buddhist philosopher Daisaku Ikeda, from Humane Education: Bridge to Peace

Thanks for reading. Apparently these are never short. 🙂

Lua Hadar

11/29/11

Musical and Cultural Nirvana: I meet and sing with Maxime Le Forestier

 June 26, 2011: The world spins in interesting ways. Two years ago I came to know the name of French pop star Maxime Le Forestier for the first time. Through a series of *French Connections*, on Wednesday 6/22, I got to meet him in person, an event which I never dreamed would take place, and right here in San Francisco. Even better, on Friday night I got to sing both for him and with him. This moment of musical and cultural nirvana I will remember for all my life.

July 24, 2009: Did it all start with Rick Steves’ guide to France? That’s where, two years ago, my fiancé Hamilton Everts saw the name of Chez Georges, on Rue des Canettes in the Latin Quarter of Paris. I had just finished a rehearsal at the Swan Bar with pianist Sheldon Forrest and I was ready for my Paris debut the following night at the petite club. I took a big hike towards the Luxembourg Gardens from the Montparnasse neighborhood, and finally found my way to Chez Georges, which satisfied all my fantasies of a Parisian local cave-bar. Upstairs wine-tasting, downstairs a world music dance club, with music curated by DJ Jean Francois Devehat, grandson of the original Georges, who hosted the likes of Bob Dylan in this underground room with a vaulted ceiling, years ago.

It was still light out, and we looked for a white wine to taste in the upstairs wine bar. A gentleman named Jacques, clearly a regular, advised us and struck up a conversation with us. Learning that we were from San Francisco, and that I was a singer, he asked if I knew the song San Francisco. Which one? The one by Maxime Le Forestier! No, I don’t know that song. His utter shock that I did not know either the song or its famous French pop singer-songwriter motivated me to write it down and look it up when I got back to San Francisco. I loved the song immediately, learned it and put it in my new show, French Connection, which debuted at San Francisco’s Rrazz Room in September 2009. The song became a favorite, and I performed it often at San Francisco’s Bliss Bar with my band, also in New York and in Lille, France (April-May 2010).

September 2010, a young French journalist named Alexis Venifleis writes an article in the San Francisco Chronicle about the Blue House, the house that was featured in the evocative lyrics of Le Forestier’s song San Francisco, (C’est une maison bleu…), written as a thank you to the inhabitants after Le Forestier stayed at the house for a month, 40 years ago, enjoying the full hippie life of San Francisco at the time. With the help of journalist Sophie Delassein, Venifleis had tracked down the Blue House, which was now sort of a greenish tan and had interviewed the current owner about this house whose history was so dear to the French, and yet quite unknown to Americans. I contacted Venifleis and invited him to hear us perform San Francisco, which we did at the Bliss Bar a few weeks later.

Fast forward to early May 2011 – through a web of French connections, I find out that Maxime Le Forestier is COMING to San Francisco. I’m wild with anticipation. The Blue House is being re-painted (blue) and will receive a commemorative plaque from the French Consulate and a visit from Maxime. A new CD is being released called The Blue House (La Maison Bleue) and at the time a concert at the Herbst was planned for June 24, which ultimately did not come to pass. But my evening of musical and cultural nirvana with Maxime Le Forestier took place exactly on that night.

June 20: A French phone number shows up incoming on my cellphone. A few hours earlier, I had spoken with the young French journalist who’d written the first Blue House article; he had just flown in from Paris. Now, it is Maxime’s producer calling me on the phone. I had been introduced to her San Francisco-based colleague by email the week before, told him about my connection to the song San Francisco, and had sent him a music track at his request. I sent Sous le Ciel de Paris (Under Paris Skies), which I recorded in 2008. Maxime’s producer wants to interview me. They are looking for a location where music can be performed for the documentary. I offer a lovely piano and living room at the yellow house of Candace Forest, (my friend and producer) who is out of town, tearing her hair out to not be in San Francisco when such exciting events are taking place.

Meantime, I am packing to go teach at the Young Actors Theatre Camp, off the grid in the woods of Santa Cruz, and it is happening in the middle of all this. No cell service, no internet. I’m leaving on Wednesday, June 22, in the evening. Won’t be back till late afternoon of Friday, June 24.

It is Wednesday, June 22, 3pm, and I go to the Blue House on 18th Street near Dolores Park for the official ceremony involving the French Consulate, Maxime, his documentary crew, and a bunch of journalists, French people from the community, and I am introduced to Maxime by his producer. (photo taken by Christine Lemor-Drake) The French Consul makes a speech, a plaque is presented to commemorate the newly painted Blue House. The cameras are all over it, click, click.

Maxime is so warm and lovely. I am embarrassed to speak French to him; we speak in English and his is very good. I tell him about my feeling for his song, San Francisco, and how honored I am to meet him. How his song has become a favorite of my audiences, touching their hearts even when they cannot understand all the words. This is true.

It is arranged that we will have a casual music session for the purpose of the documentary about the 40th Anniversary of this song and Maxime’s trip. We agree to do it at Candace’s house, and I call Jason Martineau to tell him that this is ON for Friday at 7pm. He’s been holding the time; fascinated as well, at the prospect of meeting the man whose song we have enjoyed performing.

I take off in my car. Within 2 hours I am cut off from all internet and cell phone service, in the woods, in a bunkhouse, preparing to teach an Elton John song to 10-year olds and to get them close to performance level on it in 2 days. (Electricity, from Billy Elliot)

Maxime Le Forestier’s music stays in my head. I have downloaded some of his most famous tunes and have picked out a couple more I could imagine eventually performing. I have the words but cleverly have not brought a French dictionary (no internet) and there are passages I cannot understand. But I’m listening and reading, and my heart gets him.

I’m particularly attracted to 2 songs of his. One, Saltimbanque, sounds somewhat autobiographical, about performing, and I connect with it. Another called Né Quelque Part, is about equality of people, and has a great world beat and a chorus in the Zulu language. I’m there.

Friday, June 24, 4:00pm. I’m back on the grid, having left camp, my wiggly and fabulous 10-year-olds and my dark and quiet bunk, and I’m in my car, driving towards my San Francisco studio, where I intend to renovate my camp appearance and get ready to sing with Maxime Le Forestier. Time is tight and I’m excited. I’ve got my hair dryer, a good pair of earrings and my city clothes.

Bleep! Messages begin to arrive, texts, voicemails, oh god, cops don’t get me but I’m answering everything and can’t make the damn new headset work. Do you HAVE the guitar? You want to come earlier? I’m still driving up. I can’t hear you. OK, I’ll call him. Can you hear ME? I try to text but the iPhone corrects my French to English. Is the house aired out? What if Maxime is allergic to the cat, as I am? Finally I am in my studio. The phone is still ringing. What am I going to wear? Can I get there in time? Where’s the hair dryer? Calm down and put your makeup on.

Friday, 6:50pm – I’m charging towards Candace’s house. They said they’d be there at 6:45. I’m late. Thank god David Rozelle is there, the perfect French native speaker-photographer-house sitter, with the gorgeous and talented pianist-songwriter Allison Lovejoy. Jason calls me – where are you? Where are they? Where is anybody? Is this thing really happening? 10 minutes later, we’re all there, we’re all introducing ourselves to each other: Maxime Le Forestier, this is Jason Martineau. Yes, please come in. Can I get you a glass of wine, if I force you? OK, 4 whites, one sparkling water. Is my makeup ok? Do the earrings make too much noise? Maxime would like you and Jason to perform San Francisco. Do you know any other songs of Maxime’s? Well, I’m in the process of learning some.

Maxime, salut! We clink wine glasses. I’m thrilled he has accepted a glass so I can drink one, too, and calm down. I tell him it helps my French; that I’ve been embarrassed to speak French to him. He banishes shame and embarrassment from the room. He’s warm and at ease. We begin to chat. The sound is ready, Jason’s at the piano, and the producer asks me if I will explain how I learned about the song San Francisco. I tell it to Maxime, in French. We talk about other songs of his; I mention Né Quelque Part, the one with the Zulu chorus. Maxime tries to teach me to say it in Zulu, with the difficult mouth-click sound on on the K. I try it, it eludes me, we laugh. They videotape. One take. They want it real or not at all, I think.

We perform San Francisco; Maxime’s still next to me on the light green couch; I’m sitting on the arm of the couch, between Jason at the piano and Maxime on the couch. I’ve told Maxime that we do it as a funk, with an instrumental solo; he’s cool with that. One take. They are very happy and don’t seem to want to do it again, although I’d been advised that we might do it more than once if they needed to.

Now Maxime picks up the guitar. It is a super duper fancy guitar and I have been told (by text a couple of hours before) that he loves it. They’ve borrowed it from Bobby Weinapple, my dear friend, colleague and director; I’d put them in contact earlier in the week. Whew. Shall we try one of those other tunes? Gulp; I barely know them. What about Saltimbanque, the story of the young one, born into a family of jugglers and acrobats, who can’t juggle very well but makes his way instead as a poet-singer-thinker? Yes, he leads me through it, we’re using the lyrics I’ve downloaded. I sing the choruses with him. I could cry it is so moving. I’m singing and looking into Maxim’s eyes.

Laissez-moi rester Saltimbanque.

J’aime la lumière et le feu,

Les tours et les mots dangereux

Toujours je manque.

Mon numéro n’est pas fameux.

Je jongle avec ce que je peux.

We try Né Quelque Part. I wish I’ve had time to show these to Jason ahead of time, look up all the words. We do a little of it until I get all befuddled at the Zulu chorus part. A bit later, Maxime jams with Jason on the tune. So cool. He admires Jason’s ability to improvise.

Maxime performs a solo – a new song of his, emotional, beautiful. He’s in excellent voice; the guitar is gorgeous. I’m thinking he would have done that at the Herbst tonight, had the concert not been cancelled. I’m thinking how unbelievably blessed I am to be sitting next to him on Candace’s green couch, hearing it.

8:30pm – Thank you, merci, au revoir. We are done, they are leaving to do one more shoot at the Blue House. They leave tomorrow. One more photo with Maxime, please? Goodbye, thank you, such an honor, we hope to see you in France, when is the documentary coming out? Thank you again. Au revoir. And they are gone.

DID I JUST DREAM THAT?

And they’re gone. We sit and debrief. We Skype Candace. We see a little video David was able to take, but which we’ve agreed not to publish until the documentary comes out.

CONCLUSION: These are the moments I live for. These are the moments I have sought out all my life, since I first tasted the excitement of travel as a stage-struck teenager. Editing this now, 48 hours after the fact, I am moved to tears at the memory of singing and looking into Maxime’s eyes:

 

Laissez-moi rester Saltimbanque… Je jongle avec ce que je peux.

Let me stay a performer, an acrobat… I juggle with what I can.

 

 

We will play San Francisco and very possibly a brand new English translation of it by Christine Lemor-Drake at our Bastille Day celebration at the vintage chic Bliss Bar in San Francisco on July 10, with 3 sets beginning at 4:30pm. Owner Pierre Letheule is French, loves us, and mixes a great cocktail.

JULY 10 info: http://profiles.sonicbids.com/events/index/LuaHadar/2981172

Links French:

ALL BY Sophie Delassein – Le Nouvel Observateur

http://recherche.nouvelobs.com/?q=maxime+le+forestier+

 

BIRTH OF THE SONG SAN FRANCISCO FROM MAXIME’S TIME AT BLUE HOUSE

http://tempsreel.nouvelobs.com/actualite/people/20110623.AFP5061/maxime-le-forestier-san-francisco-et-les-martiens-de-la-maison-bleue.html

 

MAXIME’S RETURN THIS WEEK TO THE BLUE HOUSE

http://tempsreel.nouvelobs.com/actualite/culture/20110622.AFP4954/c-est-une-maison-bleue-que-maxime-le-forestier-retrouve-a-san-francisco.html

 

2010 article/blog by Sophie Delassein about the origin of the song, Luc, Joan Baez, etc

http://livres-et-chansons.blogs.nouvelobs.com/index-4.html

Maxime Le Forestier website

http://www.maximeleforestier.net/

Links English: 

Chez Georges

http://www.timeout.com/paris/bars/venue/1%3A9995/chez-georges

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ebzOh1UWBSc

Blue House Article by Alexis Venifleis

http://articles.sfgate.com/2010-09-25/entertainment/24096993_1_french-tourists-french-song-blue-house